Horse Hair Pottery

  Legend holds that horsehair pottery was discovered by a pueblo potter whose long hair blew against a piece of pottery she was removing from a hot kiln, stuck, and carbonized. The result was so interesting that she duplicated it with hair from a horse’s

Artist Spotlight: Jeanette Calabaza

  Santo Domingo Pubelo, and, therefore, many of its current artists, are inescapably linked to what is known as “heishi,” the literal meaning of which is “shell” and which specifically refers to pieces of shell which have been drilled and ground into beads and strung into necklaces. It is
Posted: September 6, 2019 By:

The Jemez Pueblo Harvest Celebration

The Jemez Pueblo feast day celebrating Saint Persingula, the patron saint of the Pueblo, is held every year on August 2nd. While some rituals in most feast day celebrations are very private and secret, Palms’ owner, Guy Berger, has been invited to attend this feast several times as a
Posted: August 30, 2019 By:

The Apache Burden Basket

Once made for every day use in collecting or gathering wild foods, or to cultivate crops like corn, the Burden Basket of the Apache Tribe is one of the most quickly recognized items pertaining to Native American cultures today. The Apaches, traditionally nomadic hunters and food gatherers, first used
Posted: August 9, 2019 By:

Artist Spotlight: Anita “Pauline” Romero

  While we here at Palms treasure each relationship we have with the artists we work with daily, there are some artists, having worked with them over decades, and whom we see often, we feel special bonds with.  Our August Artist Spotlight potter, Anita “Pauline” Romero, is one of
Posted: August 2, 2019 By: