Native American Indian storytellers reflect the importance of the oral tradition to the people of the Southwestern Pueblos. Among these nations are the Isleta tribe. Storytellers are a small part of the reviving Isleta pottery tradition.

Characteristic Isleta Tribe Storytellers

In some ways, Isleta tribe storytellers are similar to Cochiti tribe storytellers—they are made of light clay with a white to whitish-gray slip and painted primarily with earth-toned colors. Like Cochiti storytellers, Isleta tribe storytellers’ faces are not very detailed, and nearly all of them are painted with their eyes closed.

However, storytellers created by Isleta tribe artists are unique in that they may be solitary figures without any listeners. Isleta tribe storytellers are also the only ones to feature polar bears.

Notable Isleta Tribe Storyteller Artists

Stella Teller and other members of the Teller family are known for their handcrafted American Indian storytellers. Stella began learning her Pueblo’s pottery tradition at the age of eight. Her work has been featured in a Smithsonian Institute traveling exhibit in 1987 and in several museums throughout the Southwest. She has taught her daughters, Mona, Robin, Christine and Lynnette, to carry on the Isleta pottery tradition as well.

Authentic Handcrafted Storytellers at Palms Trading Company

Palms Trading Company carries a fine selection of American Indian storytellers from many of the Pueblos and tribes throughout the Southwest. We buy our pieces directly from Native American artists, so we guarantee that each storyteller—whether Acoma, Cochiti, Isleta or Navajo—is authentic, handcrafted.

An authentic, handcrafted storyteller is a valuable addition to any Native American Indian art collection. But if nothing in our online selection catches your eye, contact us, and our personal shopper will help you peruse our larger in-store collection.

Contact Palms Trading Company today

for authentic Native American Indian Art

Please call us at (800) 748-1656 or (505) 247-8504